PERENNIAL VEGETABLES

ARTICHOKES

Planting

Space plants 3 feet apart with 3 feet between rows. Carefully remove Artichoke from pot. Gentle message and loosen roots. Dig a hole as deep as the pot but twice as wide. Set root ball in the hole. Backfill hole with amended soil (50% high quality compost, 50% native soil). Artichokes need full sun and good drainage.

Feeding

Fertilize with a balanced granular vegetable food – fertilize once in early spring as growth first appears and again in early July.

Harvest

Harvest artichokes in late summer and leave about an inch of stem.

Varieties:

Green Globe – old garden favorite deep green with purple tinge generally bears 3-4 heads throughout summer. Thick and flavorful hearts. Bears from second year on.

Imperial Star – The same great flavor of Green Globe on a variety the bears in the first year. The second year and on 6-8 heads that are spineless.


ASPARAGUS

Planting

Space plants 18 to 24 inches apart and plant about 5 to 6 inches deep. Asparagus like rich deep well-drained soil. Dig out a trench about 6 inches deep and 6 to 8 inches wide. Take individual crowns place finger-like roots down with pointy nub upwards. Cover with about 2 inches of soil until they start to push growth. Once they push growth fill in the rest of the trench.

Feeding

Fertilize with a balanced granular vegetable food – fertilize once in winter.

Harvest

Do not harvest the first year, this allows the asparagus to establish and become more vigorous. The second year after planting snap off tender young shoots at about 6 inches long in early spring. For the first several years only harvest for about 2 to 4 weeks as the plants age harvest can continue for 5 to 6 weeks.

Varieties:

Jersey Knight – High quality, high yielding variety that is very cold hardy and disease resistant.

Sweet Purple – Purple asparagus that turns green with cooking. Similar yield to Jersey Knight. Distinct, light-nutty flavor.


RHUBARB

Planting

Rhubarb need deep rich moist soil that is well-drained. Space plants at least 3 feet apart with 5 feet between rows. Dig a hole that is about 15 inches deep and about 24 inches wide. Mix the soil from the hole 50% high quality compost with 50% native soil; with this soil create a mound in the center of the hole and place the crown on top. Back-fill the hole with the remaining soil. Mulch in a doughnut around the crown in summer to keep plants cool and moist.  Never mulch over crown.

Feeding

Fertilize with a balanced granular vegetable food – fertilize in early spring as new growth emerges.

Harvest

Do not harvest the first year after planting. In the second year harvest lightly during the first half of summer. Twist-off up to 6 stalks per plant. Cut off all flower-stalks as soon as they emerge. After they are established up to 20 stalks per plant over a summer can be harvested.

Varieties:

Crimson Red – Plump flavorful red stalks are fiber-free, and sweet with balanced tartness.

Victoria – Old fashioned rhubarb has prolific green stalks with a red blush. Very tart and best suited to cooking.


HORSERADISH

Planting

This vigorous plant is very tolerant of various soil types and tolerates neglect. Space plants 24 inches apart. Plant the tapered end down into soil and 6 inches deep. Plant in a circle to create a dense clump.

Feeding

Fertilize sparingly with a well-balanced granular vegetable food.

Harvest

At first harvest in fall, as clump establishes harvest can be done at any time of year. Horseradish can be very pungent and irritate eyes and skin during harvest and processing, work with gloves and in an area with good ventilation.

Download a complete information sheet on growing perennial vegetables.

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